Relaxed Ltd: celebrating smallholding
Relaxed Ltd: celebrating smallholding
Relaxed Ltd: celebrating smallholding
Relaxed Ltd: celebrating smallholding
Relaxed Ltd: celebrating smallholding uk
Relaxed Ltd: celebrating smallholding uk
To find out more about the Celebrating Smallholding UK web site (currently being developed) and facebook group please contact Jack Smellie:


Visit the Celebrating Smallholding UK facebook page.



The Celebrating Smallholding UK website is due to go live sometime in February/ March 2018

It will be packed full of articles and links to support and
inspire all smallholders.

Pages will include:
< Links to local smallholding groups >

< Details of smallholding courses >

< Advice on starting in smallholding >

< Smallholding Sense: tips, articles, support >

< Livestock sections, including rare breeds >

< Inspiring posts from our Facebook page >

< FREE listings for smallholders >

< Smallholder profiles including our Passionate Ambassadors >

< Themes of the week >

Celebrating Smallholding UK

7 hours ago

Ellie Haston

My #musthavebreed has got to be Kune Kune pigs! (surprise surprise). These little pigs are the worlds smallest domesticated breed of pig (my boar comes in at 20 inches high at the shoulder) and although they are little they have the biggest personalities! I could never be without these pigs and as well as my breeding pair I have 2 pet castrates, Harry and Ron and they are the most intelligent, loyal and loving animals I have ever known. They are extremely easy to keep, they are a grazing pig and as long as there is enough grazing they don't need any extra food but like most pigs their eyes are bigger than their stomach and they will try to eat anything and everything, we always supplement their diet with treats like apples and bread and in winter they get pig pellets. They only need a relatively small amount of space and are less likely to root than commercial breeds, (although some do seem to be the exception!) and they are also brilliant mothers, sows usually require little intervention during farrowing. They are hardy and easy to train, mine all come when they are called, sit on command and follow a bucket. They are a popular pet breed because of their loving personality but also make for great tasting meat. They are a lard pig which means the meat is very juicy and makes for really tasty sausages, I have not yet raised any Kunes for meat but that is my goal for this year! (photo of the Kune Kune pork is from the BKKPS) ... See moreSee less

My #musthavebreed has got to be Kune Kune pigs! (surprise surprise). These little pigs are the worlds smallest domesticated breed of pig (my boar comes in at 20 inches high at the shoulder) and although they are little they have the biggest personalities! I could never be without these pigs and as well as my breeding pair I have 2 pet castrates, Harry and Ron and they are the most intelligent, loyal and loving animals I have ever known. They are extremely easy to keep, they are a grazing pig and as long as there is enough grazing they dont need any extra food but like most pigs their eyes are bigger than their stomach and they will try to eat anything and everything, we always supplement their diet with treats like apples and bread and in winter they get pig pellets. They only need a relatively small amount of space and are less likely to root than commercial breeds, (although some do seem to be the exception!) and they are also brilliant mothers, sows usually require little intervention during farrowing. They are hardy and easy to train, mine all come when they are called, sit on command and follow a bucket. They are a popular pet breed because of their loving personality but also make for great tasting meat. They are a lard pig which means the meat is very juicy and makes for really tasty sausages, I have not yet raised any Kunes for meat but that is my goal for this year! (photo of the Kune Kune pork is from the BKKPS)

 

Comment on Facebook

Brilliant, yet another animal I need to put on my list! Gorgeous looking animals. So at what age would they go for meat? I've also heard that the boars are happier to stay with the sows up to farrowing and can then back when piglets are still quite little! has that worked for you??

I need a couple of these!!! So cute and intelligent! Don't get many boys around like that!! πŸ˜‰πŸ˜‰

Smallest pigs?? But, what about micro pigs!!?? πŸ˜‚ **runs and hides** πŸ˜‡πŸ˜‡

Love my Kune kune pigs, only have sixteen oldies now.

They are just gorgeous, I can see why you have fallen in love with them 😍😍

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7 hours ago

Sarah Hudgins

Thought I should introduce myself before revealing my #MustHaveBreed. I'm Sarah, a Data Analyst from Derbados. We've recently had to cut back on the animals we keep after losing some rented land (no longer have the pigs, goats and poultry) but I still have my beloved sheep which are mainly Coloured Ryelands but with a random Hampshire Down, Herdwicks, a Leicester Longwool and a few cross breeds as well as the 7 alpacas which look after the lambs. I also have 3 ex racehorses; Sam, Dodge (as in burger dodger) and Dangerous Brian and last but not least the mini donkey, Timothy. Last year I had my first foray into needle felting and for Christmas I received a spinning wheel so looking forward to learning all about that! My must have breed is the Coloured Ryeland. Nice to look at, great fleece in interesting colours, docile, robust, great Mothers and taste amazing! ... See moreSee less

Thought I should introduce myself before revealing my #MustHaveBreed. Im Sarah, a Data Analyst from Derbados. Weve recently had to cut back on the animals we keep after losing some rented land (no longer have the pigs, goats and poultry) but I still have my beloved sheep which are mainly Coloured Ryelands but with a random Hampshire Down, Herdwicks, a Leicester Longwool and a few cross breeds as well as the 7 alpacas which look after the lambs. I also have 3 ex racehorses; Sam, Dodge (as in burger dodger) and Dangerous Brian and last but not least the mini donkey, Timothy. Last year I had my first foray into needle felting and for Christmas I received a spinning wheel so looking forward to learning all about that! My must have breed is the Coloured Ryeland. Nice to look at, great fleece in interesting colours, docile, robust, great Mothers and taste amazing!

 

Comment on Facebook

Welcome Sarah, what a fabulous array of animals, I do love the Coloured Ryelands, always think they look such cheerful sheep. Your needle felting is amazing, do you use the alpacas fibre as well. I have a friend who has got into it and is hopefully going to create my dogs using our Shetland sheep wool and alpacas fibre mixed together. Will you start selling your felted pieces - I am sure they would be snapped up??

Welcome Sarah, that’s quite an assortment, and quite a mix of personalities I guess.

And here was everyone who knows you thought it was miniature donkeys that were your must have breed lol

17 hours ago

Sarah Moore

Shhh! Don't tell my husband but thinking of getting sheep for our 5 acre fields. Would have to be from May as the land is rented out till then. Which breed in your opinion is the best to get for a novice? I like the look of shetlands and those beautiful rare ones with black faces with long fleeces (can't remember their name) and soays look quite robust.. ... See moreSee less

 

Comment on Facebook

Shame u not ready I may have 38 soay in lamb at weekend

Texel or Suffolk for meat or pets something small

We are also more interested in rare breeds.

Will have loads of Leicester longwool soon

shetlands are a lovely breed can also be crossed for a bigger meat lamb or kept pure lovely wool great characters friendly easy lambers

Any experience of valais black nosed sheep?

Shetlands are lovely Sarah, easy to handle, lovely fleeces, hardy, lamb really well, get VERY tame AND I will have lambs in the spring.....

PS - and Shetlands are just a tad cheaper than the very gorgeous valais black nosed...

Love our Shetlands,, they do a good job of trying to survive and are SO versatile 😘

lovely ewe

Jacob supporter here ☺️

There are quite a few Gotland flocks down your way. They are lovely friendly sheep with stunning fleeces and no horns.

Some of our jacobs...hardy ancient hill breed that thrives in areas others can’t

I have a small amount of gotland fleece that I have just started needle felting with lovely

If you want something hardy, and less intense on the land, i would highly recommend the Hebridean. I have kept them for 5 years now with minimal issues in comparison to the mules I keep. They like a little forage as well as a graze so are good and keeping down some of the unwanted weeds. You can find info on the breed along with pics on my website. slatehousefarm.co.uk/sheep/

Everybody will tell you their own breed is best πŸ˜‰, you have to go with something you like. I have a friend near South Melton having to give up sheep for a while. Pm me if you would like to know more. πŸ‘

Volker Chris Sander had some shetlands for sale x

We have just rented out our 6 acre field as couldn’t decide whether to get sheep yet. I really liked the look of the grey faced dartmoors and also coloured ryelands. X

Easycare sheep! I made a case for them on this page a few days ago if you can find it? Basically they dont need shearing which is an enormous benefit and makes them less prone to fly strike. They are disease resistant. Ive never had to dag ours, thry make excellent easy mothers. They are not skittish (unlike a lot of the primitive self moulting species), and tame very easily. They dont have horns to trim or get stuck in the fence either. Dead easy - I love mine

Hiya, to answer your questions, if you want to breed, then yes get girls, starting with ewe lambs is fab cos you have over a year to get to know them before putting them with the ram, you can borrow rams yes, if you have one yourself he will need separating some of the time when the ewes lamb and so he doesn't mate with them again too quickly. Some people keep their rams separate all the time with perhaps a wether as company, others keep them with the ewes as long as they can. If you are after just lawn mowers, ewes or wethers are fine. Ewe lambs (traditional/rare breeds) can cost anything from Β£30/40 upwards depending on the breed, some are vastly more expensive. Start with a few as you will probably want to keep some of your own lambs if you breed. And Jean is right, we will all tell you our breed is best. Go for one you like the look of and that you think you can handle and that will suit your land - happy to talk sheep if you wanted to pop back over any time and can also recommend Gillian Dixon's sheep course over at South Yeo East Farm, Northlew... (PS, hope yesterday went okay and will be thinking of you on Thursday...)

Thank you so much. Maybe we can make a date late winter early spring to come over and look at birds and lambs? I will look into the course. They should be lawnmowers but I know I will want to go the whole hog and breed as well. I will let you know how it goes on Thursday x

Find someone bear you that keeps sheep in the meantime and get them to show you the basics, they aren't as straightforward to keep well as you might think so forewarned is forearmed. County shows are great places to go and look at lots of breeds too

Shetland supporter here.i had all breeds initially and now only have Shetlands due to their fan feet, easy lambing, top notch mothering ability and the fact we get Β£15 for each of our fleeces. I used to have to give the others away. The meat is second to none and they do not need concentrate feeding, nor their lambs so cheap to keep on good quality jay and a good lick over winter. In 9 years, O have had the bet twice..once she came out and once a free telephone call. They are hardy as hell and beautiful.

Cannot go wrong with Jacobs

What about jacobs?..i have recently got some they are so pretty to look at,my ram is like a dog...so friendly!

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